• Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

Introduction

Visioning and Organizational Development

The first step of developing any initiative is identifying your mission, purpose and the impact of the tragedy in your community. It is the foundation of a leading organization.
This module will give you the framework you need to establish your mission, identify your purpose and measure the impact of the tragedy in your community.

Module 1 provides “Roadmap Charting” to help you establish your vision and mission statement. Where a page contains “Roadmap Charting”, click SUBMIT to save your information before moving to the next page.

There is no time limit to complete the module, you can come back to it anytime.

To navigate through the module, click on the arrow buttons below or use the right and left arrow keys on your keyboard. To navigate to a specific section, click on the title at the top of the page.


  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

VISION AND MISSION STATEMENT

Mission Statement

Describes what an organization wants to do now – it answers the question, why do we exist?
It is the “North Star” that keeps everyone clear on the direction of the organization.
It tells you what you are doing today and that will then take you where you want to go in the future.
It is the reason for the organization’s existence.

Vision Statement

Describes what an organization wants to be in the future.
A statement of its vision outlines an organization’s goals for the community it serves.

Tuesday's Children Example

Our Mission:

Tuesday’s Children provides a lifetime of healing for those who have been forever changed by terrorism and traumatic loss.

Our Vision:

Tuesday’s Children offers a time-tested, long-term approach – forged in the aftermath of Tuesday, September 11, 2001 – that enables children, families, and communities torn apart by acts of violence to heal, recover and thrive for a lifetime.

Note:

Our initial service population was the 3,051 children who lost a parent and all families who lost a loved one on that day. We later expanded to include other populations — first responders and their families, global victims of terrorism, military families of the fallen, and local communities experiencing traumatic loss.
No other organization has then early two decades of experience of Tuesday’s Children has in providing a broad range of long-term support programs to the entire 9/11 community.

  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

VISION AND MISSION STATEMENT

Vision Statement

Concentrates on the present; it defines the audience, critical processes and it informs you about the desired level of performance.

Mission Statement

Focuses on the future; it is a source of inspiration and motivation. It often describes not just the future of the organization, but also the future of the community in which the organization hopes to effect change.

  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

VISION AND MISSION STATEMENT

Charting Your Long-Term Healing Roadmap

Time to take the first step to identifying what you want your organization to accomplish. This will help inform your mission and vision statements.
What do you do today? Who do you serve and why? What is the benefit? Enter your thoughts below.
(Resource material: Mission and Vision Statement Comparison Chart.)

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  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

RIPPLE EFFECT: THE SCOPE OF 9/11

Every traumatic event has its own set of ripple effects. It is important to understand how the ripple effect can impact your community. Terrorism and human-caused disasters can result in long-term stress and disruption among communities because of their uncertain and long-lasting nature.

2,977 individuals from 90+ nations were killed 90,000 people responded in recovery efforts
1,609 people lost a spouse Nearly 40,000 people suffer from 9/11-related illnesses
3,051 children lost a parent (the average age child who lost a parent on 9/11 was 8) 600,000 people were exposed to harmful toxins at the World Trade Center site
60% of Americans watched the attacks live on TV 422,000 New Yorkers suffered from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) after 9/11
20% of Americans knew someone hurt or killed in 9/11 attacks 3.7 million+ U.S. troops have served in the post-9/11 era

  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

POSITIVE RIPPLE EFFECT

Tuesday’s Children was formed to promote long-term healing in all those directly impacted by the events of Tuesday, September 11, 2001. Since 2001, Tuesday's Children has helped more than 15,000 individuals impacted by 9/11 and similar tragedies, including:

9/11 FAMILIES

Tuesday's Children has served thousands of family members of the 2,977 victims of the September 11th attacks.
The Tuesday's Children program model has served as a resource for the vast community of families who experienced a loss on 9/11. Our family-focused support endures long after the media and other aid organizations have moved on. Our programs have brought promising post-traumatic growth to families impacted by 9/11.

 
As a consistent service provider for over a decade to this bereaved community, we have gained the trust of family members, a difficult yet vital task when responding to a traumatic event. This consistency has linked families with similar experiences, creating a community of support, which has had a profoundly positive impact on their collective healing.

RESCUE AND RECOVERY WORKERS

Tuesday's Children has served thousands of responder families.
The long-term effects of 9/11, such as terminal diagnoses and PTSD, are growing exponentially. Their needs for long term support and assistance are great, and oftentimes, underserved. Of the 90,000 rescue and recovery workers and 600,000 survivors exposed, the World Trade Center Health Program has registered only a fraction of eligible participants.
Nearly 2000 people have died from 9/11-related illnesses:

  1. The majority of illnesses diagnosed are aero-digestive problems.
  2. 5,500+ people have been diagnosed with cancer.
  3. 300+ FDNY & NYPD members have died from 9/11 related illnesses as of 2018.
  4. Over 6,000 separate cancers have been diagnosed.

The Zadroga Act, which secures health monitoring and treatment for rescue and recovery workers, was renewed for 70 years at the end of 2015. On September 11, 2016, Governor Cuomo signed legislation reopening the World Trade Center Health Registry, allowing 9/11 responders to file new claims.

MILITARY FAMILIES

Service members and their families have endured significant hardship as a result of U.S. military interventions in response to the attacks of September 11th, 2001. The scale of the military mobilization and its aftermath have required a robust response from service providers:

  1. 3.7 million troops deployed = 3.7 million families impacted
  2. 20,000+ U.S. military deaths since 2001
  3. 7,000+ U.S. military killed in action
  4. Approximately 20 military veteran suicides every day
  5. 50,000+ troops wounded since 2001
  6. 44% of veterans have children
  7. Tens of Thousands of children have lost a military parent
  8. 60% of children of active-duty fallen are under 12
  9. 27% are under 5
  10. 63% of families of active-duty fallen earn less than $50,000/yr (below the U.S. median income)
  11. 97% of post-9/11 military casualties are male

GLOBAL TRAGEDIES

Tuesday’s Children has served more than 700 international youth from 28 countries through Project COMMON BOND and has provided long-term healing support to global and local communities impacted by terrorism and traumatic loss, including Newtown, CT; Orlando, FL, Parkland, FL; Las Vegas, NV.

While global and domestic terrorism existed prior to this event, there has been a surge in frequency of these events in recent years. Mass shootings and domestic terrorism are issues of grave concern not only for Americans, but global populations as well:

  1. Since 2000, over 73,000 global terrorist incidents have cause more than 170,000 deaths.
  2. Mass shootings happen every 9 out of 10 days in the United States.
  3. One third of the victims of mass shootings are under the age of 18.


  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

SNAPSHOT OF SERVICES

Services To Bereaved Families

Family-focused services are designed to facilitate the ongoing healing process, counter a tendency to isolate, promote a sense of belonging, and provide the life management tools that are key to family resiliency.

Services To Responder Families

As an outgrowth of our founding mission to meet the needs of every individual impacted by the events of 9/11,Tuesday’s Children has incorporated the families of 9/11 rescue and recovery workers into our programming.

International Programs

Project COMMON BOND, created in 2008 has united over 700 youth from 28 countries who have lost a loved one to terrorism, violent extremism or war.. The program uses a curriculum focused on dignity, peacebuilding and therapeutic arts. Chaperones representing participant countries share cross-cultural perspectives in working with victims of terrorism and participate in facilitated sessions learning Tuesday’s Children’s Long-Term Healing Model.

Military Initiatives

Our military initiatives serve primarily Military Families of the Fallen. We have also incorporated family-focused programming for families of returning veterans and continue to expand these services

Tuesday’s Children shares our lessons learned and our proven approach with other communities impacted by devastating tragedies, including incidents of terrorism and mass shootings. The Resiliency Center of Newtown, CT, was founded as a program of Tuesday's Children and is now a standalone non-profit supporting the Newtown Sandy Hook community. We have provided individualized support to providers and organizations in Orlando, FL; Parkland, FL; Las Vegas, NV; Paris, France; and Manchester, UK.

Long-Term Healing

Tuesday’s Children shares our lessons learned and our proven approach with other communities impacted by devastating tragedies, including incidents of terrorism and mass shootings. The Resiliency Center of Newtown, CT, was founded as a program of Tuesday's Children and is now a standalone non-profit supporting the Newtown Sandy Hook community. We have provided individualized support to providers and organizations in Orlando, FL; Parkland, FL; Las Vegas, NV; Paris, France; and Manchester, UK. Tuesday’s Children is the only U.S. organization listed in the UN Victims of Terrorism Support Portal.


  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

KEY TAKEAWAY

Every traumatic event has its own set of ripple effects that have a broad impact outside of the community that was directly affected. It is not always apparent which additional populations were impacted.

  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

RIPPLE EFFECT

Charting Your Long-Term Healing Roadmap

Measuring the impact of a tragedy in your community is an important component when developing a plan for long-term healing.

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  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

RIPPLE EFFECT

Charting Your Long-Term Healing Roadmap

Specify age groups in your service population and needs specific to those groups. This will help to understand themes and trajectories in trauma, grief and bereavement based on the ages of your service population.

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  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

EMOTIONAL IMPACT

Incidents of terrorism and traumatic loss have a profound emotional impact. The sudden and violent nature of this loss is a unique and defining characteristic of trauma. Traumatic wounds are complicated and often take time to heal.
Emotional impact of traumatic loss:

Losing a loved one under sudden and traumatic circumstances has a lifelong impact.
Emotional and physical wounds linger and further disrupt family dynamics.
  1. Profound loss and/or trauma
  2. Financial uncertainty
  3. Disrupted family dynamics
  4. Psychological impact
  5. Fear of being forgotten
  6. Social isolation

  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

DEFINITIONS OF TRAUMA AND GRIEF

Trauma

An emotional response to a terrible event like an accident, rape or natural disaster. Immediately after the event,shock and denial are typical. Longer term reactions include unpredictable emotions, flashbacks, strained relationships and even physical symptoms like headaches or nausea. While these feelings are normal, some people have difficulty moving on with their lives. (American Psychological Association)

Grief

The natural reaction to loss. Grief is both a universal and a personal experience. Individual experiences of grief vary and are influenced by the nature of the loss. Some examples of loss include the death of a loved one, the ending of an important relationship, job loss, loss through theft or the loss of independence through disability. (Mayo Clinic)

  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

TRAUMA AND GRIEF

TRAUMA AND GRIEF

Trauma and grief are labels for emotional states that are very difficult to fully comprehend and can vary widely. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (commonly referred to as DSM) diagnoses are often according to trends and do not fully encompass all personal experiences.

Trauma is multifaceted and it can affect more than those who directly experienced a traumatic event. They might include:
  1. Descendants of traumatized individuals such as grandchildren (intergenerational transmission of trauma)
  2. Societies (cultural trauma)
  3. Caregivers (vicarious trauma)
Grief is equally as varied, as are the individual trajectories of those experiencing it. People may experience:
  1. A preoccupation with thoughts and memories of the event or loss that impacts existing relationships and personal beliefs (Complicated Grief)
  2. A sense of a lack of closure that delays and complicates the grieving process (Ambiguous Loss)
  3. Hyperarousal, avoidance and re-experiencing symptoms (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder)

The nature of some of these symptoms might make sufferers less likely to seek care or access mental health services, making diagnosis difficult.


  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

ORIGINS OF TUESDAY'S CHILDREN

Tuesday’s Children was founded as a community-based initiative in response to the devastating emotional impact of 9/11.
Click on each of the following to learn about the creation of our organization.

Where

We were formed in Manhasset, NY, a community heavily impacted on 9/11.

When

Tuesday’s Children received its 501C3 status December 4, 2001.

Why

We were created by families and friends who experienced a direct loss and wanted to give children the childhood experiences they might otherwise miss out on due to the loss of their parent—not to replace the parent, but to remember and honor them.

What

Our first goals were to provide families with fun activities, a support network, and child mentoring.

How

Create long-term healing programs to help alleviate the reactions and symptoms caused by the impact of 9/11.


  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

WHAT WE HAVE LEARNED

Over the last 15 years serving the 9/11 community and others impacted by traumatic loss, we have established this “Long-Term Healing Model” for supporting communities on the road to resilience and recovery.

We have learned that communities need:

LONG-TERM COMMITMENT

Long-term commitment and response—understanding traumatic events have a lifelong impact on children and families and their needs change over time.

BROAD COMMUNITY OUTREACH

A broad, community-based approach to outreach and service delivery, incorporating non-traditional models of engagement and bringing services directly to families in their communities.

ADAPTIVE APPROACH

A needs-based approach to evaluating, adapting and evolving programs and services, including ongoing individual, family and community needs assessments.

EVIDENCE-BASED PROGRAMS

Evidence-based services that build resilience—it is important to use proven programs that have delivered results in other settings. Often these approaches need to be adapted to the population’s specific needs in order to be engaging and build strength and resilience.

CAREFULLY SELECTED PARTNERSHIPS

It is vital to carefully select and vet program partnerships with organizations and individuals who share our mission, respect the needs of our families and fulfill a specific purpose.

FAMILY AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

Incorporating family or community involvement and feedback at all stages of organizational development, program development, evaluation and outreach is key. Tuesday’s Children has relied on our Family Advisory Board and community assessments when developing and adapting our programs. Many of our programs, like Project COMMON BOND, originated from the ideas of the children and families we serve.


  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

EMOTIONAL IMPACT

Charting Your Long-Term Healing Roadmap

What are your guiding principles (any principle or precept that guides an organization throughout its life in all circumstances, irrespective of changes in its goals, strategies, type of work, or the top management)?

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  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

EMOTIONAL IMPACT

Charting Your Long-Term Healing Roadmap

What are your goals and objectives? List 3-5 brief, measurable and attainable goals. (Helpful words to start your goals and objectives with include: create, implement, employ, build, activate, advocate, support, provide, etc.)

(Resource material: S.M.A.R.T. Goals Worksheet: Specific, Measurable, Agreed Upon, Realistic, Time Based.

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  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

EMOTIONAL IMPACT

Charting Your Long-Term Healing Roadmap

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  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

MAINTAINING ADAPTABILITY: EVOLUTION OF OUR MISSION

Original

Our original mission statement was very wordy, but conveyed our commitment to the children who lost a parent:
Tuesday’s Children, a ‘by the families – for the families’ non-profit organization founded by the brothers, colleagues and friends of World Trade Center victims, has made an eighteen year commitment to each of the thousands of children who lost a parent on Tuesday, September 11th 2001. Our children and their families, having lost a guiding light in their lives, must not be left to walk their path alone. Tuesday’s Children’s programs – based on family and community interaction – create the ongoing structure and support necessary to insure a happy and healthy future.

2014

Our mission evolved as programs grew:
Tuesday’s Children is a non-profit service organization that has made an 18-year commitment to every child who lost a parent on September 11, 2001, providing a wide range of programming, from mentoring, to advocacy for children, to next-step skills and leadership training for adults. Tuesday’s Children’s programs are created by the families, for the families with one simple goal – to develop the resources necessary to ensure these families reach their full potential.

2011

After the 10th anniversary, the wording needed to change to incorporate expansion populations while keeping the promise
to our original constituents:
Tuesday’s Children was founded to promote long-term healing in all those directly impacted by the events of September 11, 2001. Our mission today is to keep the promise to those children and families while serving and supporting communities affected by acts of terror worldwide.

Current

Tuesday’s Children provides a lifetime of healing for those who have been forever changed by terrorism and traumatic loss.


  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

ADAPTABLE MODEL

Our adaptable model for community long-term healing includes our long-term vision, mission, flexible approach and commitment to our service populations. It begins with creating trust, building community, engaging our service population, assessing their needs and creating programs to address needs. We continually reassess needs and adapt our programs to best serve our families and Keep the Promise , which aids in the healing and recovery of the families we serve.

  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

SIGNATURE PROGRAMS

Many of our programs can be adapted and replicated. For example, Creative Insight, which has now been replicated in multiple settings, serves 9/11 family members, responders, military widows, and school workers and bereaved families in Newtown, CT. Many of our signature programs are evidence based and have proven outcomes in supporting those impacted by traumatic loss.

Engagement & Outreach

Engagement and outreach programs are perhaps most important in building trust, staying connected with families and keeping our finger on the pulse of their needs.

Career Programs

Career Programs were developed early on for parents and adults and we have provided college and career advisement to children throughout. This has grown over the years into our Career Resource Center as our youth population has aged.

Skills Development

Skills development programs are offered to families, particularly youth, in order to to provide coping mechanisms and life management strategies that aid participants through life events such as transition to new schools, financial planning, etc.

Mental Health & Wellness

This is something not all people pursue immediately after a traumatic event, but it is important to have in place and is the underpinning of many of our other programs.

Project COMMON BOND

Project COMMON BOND has united over 700 international youth from 28 countries impacted by terrorism to engage in dignity-focused activities, learn about peace-building and form lasting friendships.

Creative Insight

This skills-based program was offered early on to more than 400 individuals and has now been replicated in multiple settings helping: 9/11 family members;, responder families;,school workers and bereaved community members in Newtown, CT; and, most recently,surviving family members of post-9/11 fallen military service members.

Youth Mentoring

Has served more than hundreds of children—pairing them with adults in the community who can understand their loss. The length of matches sets it apart, some spanning more than a decade.

Helping Heals

Helping Heals is a service-learning initiative where.Tuesday’s Children’s families give back to others in need.toThe desire of our family members to want to give back to others is indicative of their post-traumatic growth. Helping Heals programs can change their view from “victim” to someone with self-efficacy and self-esteem.

Project Heart to Heart

Heart to Heart brings together Gold Star widows and widowsmothers for healing retreats where they engage in peer support and conduct dialogues about dignity, trauma, self-care and resilience.

Many of our programs can be adapted and replicated. For example, Creative Insight, which has now been replicated in multiple settings, serves 9/11 family members, responders, military widows, and school workers and bereaved families in Newtown, CT. Many of our signature programs are evidence based and have proven outcomes in supporting those impacted by traumatic loss.


  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

Introduction

The snapshot below highlights the timeline of our key programs over the course of our 17 years of serving families impacted by 9/11:

2001

Formation of Tuesday’s Children and first programs

2002

Partnership with Bear Sterns: Bear Cares, a mentoring program for 9/11 children

2003

First Creative Insight
Youth Mentoring Program is founded

2004

First teen programming launches: Take Our Children to Work Day and Career Paths

2006

First Responder Alliance is formed to serve families of 9/11 rescue and recovery workers

2007

First Helping Heals program held

2008

First annual Project COMMON BOND

2009

First programming initiative incorporating military families

2010

Junior Board is founded

2011

Families commemorative 10th anniversary of 9/11

2012

Career Resource Center launches

2013

Resiliency Center of Newtown opens in response to December 14, 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary

2014

First Project Heart to Heart retreat with 9/11 and military widows

2015

Extensive outreach for Military Initiative for Families of the Fallen

2016

Long-Term Healing Model training curriculum launches

2017

Tuesday’s Children launches Youth Mentoring for Military Families
of the Fallen

2018

Launch of TuesdaysChildrenHeals.org site housing resources on long-term healing


  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

MAINTAINING ADAPTABILITY

Charting Your Long-Term Healing Roadmap

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  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

Organizational Development

Organizational development helps improve the foundation for long-term success.
Tuesday’s Children developed on a community level by working with family members, friends, supporters and volunteers. The foundation of our organization is supported on both ends by our internal boards and our external partners and funders. From this we have grown from a staff of two in 2001. We expanded to five offices at one point in multiple states and today we have a staff of 12 in three offices, serving over 15,000 individuals in 48 U.S states and 28 countries,current staff of 15.

  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

STAFFING

Non-profit organizations need to attend to the same tasks as profit-seeking companies do when they turn to the challenges of establishing and maintaining a solid work force.
Tuesday’s Children’s current staff gets consistent advisement from our Board of Directors, our Junior Board, and our Family Advisory Board. Across all departments we work with trusted consultants and contractors who further our mission.

  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

BOARD STRUCTURE

Every non-profit board is responsible for creating a structure, policies, and procedures that support good governance. The term "board organization" encompasses a variety of tasks, from routine matters such as preparing a schedule of board meetings to actions with broader consequences such as developing a policy about terms of service.
Click on each key consideration for more information about board structure.

BOARD SIZE

The organization's structure and needs are among the factors that determine board size. In considering the size of the board, every board needs a sufficient range of expertise to accomplish the organization's mission. If a board is too small, its members may be overworked and unproductive. If a board is too large, every member may not have the opportunity to participate actively.

BOARD MEMBER'S TERMS

There are no fixed rules for determining board members' tenure. Many organizations do, however, limit members to two consecutive terms and require a hiatus of one year before a board member may be reappointed. Many organizations also stagger terms of service so that one half or one third of the board is elected every one or two years for terms of two to four years. Such policies encourage institutional renewal because a board can profit from the experience of veteran board members while welcoming the fresh perspective that new members offer.

BOARD COMMITTEES

Much of the work that a board does is accomplished through its committees and task forces. With the exception of the Executive Committee, which acts on the board's behalf, committees recommend action to the full board for discussion and action. Most boards need only a few standing committees - the rest of the work can be accomplished by task forces created for a specific purpose. Common standing committees include:

  1. Governance Committee
  2. Audit Committee
  3. Finance Committee
  4. Executive Committee (if needed)

CHOOSING COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Every board member should serve on at least one but preferably no more than two committees or task forces. Members are appointed by the chair in consultation with the Governance Committee. Committee size depends on the needs of the board and the organization and a common sense assessment of how many people are needed to carry out the committee's work.
Make committee assignments based on the experience, skills, interests, and available time of board members. Each member must make a serious commitment to participate actively in the work of the committee. If a committee is too large, a small group of members may have a disproportionate amount of responsibility. If a committee is too small, there may not be enough people to get the job done. Board committees may include people who are not board members.


  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

TUESDAY'S CHILDREN'S BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Tuesday’s Children’s Board of Directors is diverse and composed of representatives of our service populations and a range of areas of expertise.

The Board of Directors is divided into committees in order to:

  1. Share and delegate work according to each member’s competency
  2. Implement a system of checks and balances
  3. Facilitate the swift completion of Board-related tasks

The board structure is made up of seven committees:

  1. Marketing and Public Relations
  2. Development Committee
  3. Finance Committee
  4. Operating Committee
  5. Program Committee
  6. Governance Committee
  7. Audit Committee


  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

ORGANIZATION DEVELOPMENT

Charting Your Long-Term Healing Roadmap

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  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

It is vital to think strategically about who to partner with in providing long-term support and maintaining the trust of your population. It is important to vet your community partnerships to ensure mission alignment, long-term commitment and a competency in the specific needs of your population(s).

The following chart identifies our most/least effective partnerships identified from a key stakeholder survey (2014):

  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

Strengthen Your Non-profit with a Strategic Partnership

The first step to planning a partnership is to clearly define what you want to get out of it.
Click on each panel to view potential ways that a non-profit partnership can be beneficial.

INCREASE BRAND EXPOSURE

One of the main advantages a non-profit partnership can offer is increased visibility for your brand. Natural cross-promotion allows you to easily reach another organization’s network. Depending on the nature of the partnership, a partner can feature you on their website, social channels, or regular communications to their community. Keep in mind that you can consider approaching for-profit companies too.

INCREASE THE RANGE OF SERVICES YOU OFFER

If you’re looking to advance your mission and enhance your programmatic impact (without funding a whole new program), a strategic partnership can give you access to tools, resources, and services you need.
One way to expand your range of services is to launch a joint initiative with another organization that has a similar mission. You can supplement each other’s services to broaden your offerings. By teaming up, both organizations can expand the services they provide without hiking up their budget. A relationship like this also allows both parties to still operate independently. Rather than consolidating programs, you would simply share information and coordinate your efforts.

SAVE ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS

If you’re explicitly looking to cut administrative costs, the partnership type you select depends on your financial needs. Non-profits that are tightly strapped financially sometimes consider integrating with another organization. If you’re looking to cut down infrastructure or administrative costs without sacrificing autonomy, there are other options. You might approach local organizations (either non-profit or for-profit) that can share expenses to rent facilities or buy office equipment and supplies. Sharing workspaces can be a great way to save money, and it can encourage collaboration and increase your visibility. Sharing spaces can often lead to sharing staff or departments as well. If you’re in the same space, you can share an IT department or train staff together. You might even collaborate to build a preferred vendor program.

INCREASE BRAND CREDIBILITY

A non-profit partnership can also elevate your organization’s credibility and support. By partnering with a well-known and trusted organization, you can increase your visibility and improve the public’s perception of your own brand. This can help you build trust and attract support. Likewise, an incompatible partnership can damage your reputation, so choose your partner wisely. Partnerships need to be vetted to ensure mission alignment, long-term commitment and a competency in the specific needs of your population(s).


  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

KEY TAKEAWAYS

The first step to planning a partnership is to clearly define what you want to get out of it.It is important to vet your community partnerships with organizations that share your mission.
Keep your goals front and center as you explore the possibilities in order to choose the right partner and develop an alliance that will deliver the best results.

  • Introduction
  • Vision & Mission Statement
  • Ripple Effect
  • Emotional Impact
  • Maintaining Adaptability
  • Organizational Development
  • Community Partnerships

COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

Charting Your Long-Term Healing Roadmap

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